US Accuses Russia of Deploying Space Weapon

Russia | May 22, 2024, Wednesday // 12:22|  views

The United States has accused Russia of deploying a space weapon into orbit last week, alleging that the Kosmos 2576 satellite launched by Russia's Plesetsk Cosmodrome is capable of targeting other satellites, similar to those operated by the US government. Pentagon spokesman Brigadier General Pat Ryder stated that the satellite poses a potential threat to US interests, as reported by the BBC.

Launched on May 16, the Kosmos 2576 satellite orbits in close proximity to a US government satellite, according to the Pentagon. Ryder emphasized that the US will closely monitor the situation and take necessary measures to safeguard its assets.

In a statement to Reuters, a US Space Command spokesperson described the satellite as a "likely counter space weapon," capable of potentially attacking other satellites in low Earth orbit. However, the Kremlin has yet to respond to the allegations, while Russia's state space agency Roscosmos stated that the launch was conducted in the interest of the Russian Ministry of Defense, utilizing a Soyuz-2.1b launch vehicle.

Analysts have noted the close proximity of the Russian satellite to the American satellite USA 314 in terms of orbit alignment. The development comes amidst escalating tensions between Moscow and Washington at the United Nations over the militarization of space, with both countries accusing each other of aggressive behavior in space-related activities.

A report by the Center for Strategic and International Studies highlighted Russia's efforts in developing anti-satellite weapons, including a missile successfully tested in November 2021 against a defunct Soviet-era satellite. This latest incident underscores growing concerns about the potential weaponization of space and its implications for international security.

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Tags: US, weapon, Russia, satellite

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