Charlie Hebdo's New Edition Out with New Prophet Image on Cover

EU | January 14, 2015, Wednesday // 08:41|  views

A man reads the new edition of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo at Gare de Lyon train station, in Paris, France, 14 January 2015. Photo by EPA/BGNES

French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo's new edition is attracting huge interest hours after going on sale, with unprecedented circulation and e-versions in five languages, including Turkish and Arabic.

The magazine, which was subject to an attack that claimed the lives of 12 people last week, is now bearing a cartoon of Prophet Muhammad on its cover enjoying a mixed reception.

Less than a week after the events which were most likely caused by depictions of the Prophet and Islam, the former is seen on Charlie Hebdo's front cover weeping and holding a sign reading "I am Charlie" (or "Je suis Charlie" as it became commonly known).

Above, there is a slogan saying "All is forgiven" ("Tout est pardonn?" in French).

Inside the paper there are no more Muhammad cartoons, but there is one depicting two extremists ascending to heaven which was originally intended to be on the cover but was then rejected.

As many as 3 million copies of the magazine have been printed, compared to a previous circulation of roughly 60 000 on a weekly basis.


Commuters queue to buy the new edition of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo at Gare de Lyon train station, in Paris, France, 14 January 2015.

The new issue, which has already turned into a major event for many, with people queueing to buy a copy.

"The front page... was complicated to put together, because it had to express something new, it had to say something relating to the event that we had to deal with," Gerard Biard, Charlie Hebdo's new Editor-in-chief, is quoted by the BBC as saying.

His predecessor St?phane Charbonnier was killed by the Kouachi brothers in the magazine's offices on Wednesday.

The new issue has already come under fire by various Muslim representatives, with Egypt's Grand Mufti Sheikh Shawqi Allam calling the decision to publish a new Muhammad cartoon "an act of racism" and "an insult to Muslims around the world."

Meanwhile security has been stepped up in Paris and across France in the last days, and 10 000 troops have been deployed in the aftermath of the attacks.

In Europe and the US, many outlets have chosen not to show the cartoon.


Tags: Prophet Muhammad, Charlie Hebdo, cartoons, Islam, Gerard Biard, Stephane Charbonnier

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