Egypt Declares 'Salvation Cabinet' amid Violent Protests

World | November 22, 2011, Tuesday // 20:01|  views

A file photograph showing Egyptin Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, head of Egypt`s ruling military council, points to a painting at the defence ministry in Cairo, Egypt, 13 September 2011. EPA/BGNES

Negotiating parties in Egypt have reached the decision to form a national salvation government to effect transition in the country, as people are protesting what they see as excessively slow democratization.

Egypt's Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, which holds power in the country after the January ousting of longtime President Hosni Mubarak, has called a meeting of key political actors reach an agreement about how to tackle the situation.

Meanwhile, fresh protests in the central Tahrir Square have led to clashes with security forces, which have resulted in dozens persons wounded Tuesday.

"An agreement was made to form a government of national salvation whose mission will be to achieve the goals of the Revolution of January 25," said Mohammad Salim Al-Awa, a participant in the meeting who has stated he will run for President in elections in the spring of 2012.

The name of former IAEA general director Mohamed ElBaradei has been mentioned among the potential candidates to take the helm of the interim cabinet.

Tuesday is the fourth day of protests in Cairo, with at least 33 people having lost their lives since unrest erupted last Saturday.

Monday in Egypt the interim government of Essam Sharaf handed in its resignation under the popular pressure.

Protesters are fearing that the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, led by Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, might in turn install a longterm undemocratic rule of the country.

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Tags: Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, Egypt, protests, protesters, Cairo, Tahrir, Hosni Mubarak, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, Mohamed ElBaradei, Mohammad Salim Al-Awa, democratization

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