CSKA Ex-President Threatens Former Bulgaria PM with Prosecution

Crime | October 19, 2009, Monday // 18:13|  views

The ex-President of the Bulgarian CSKA Football Club, Alexander Tomov, during the Monday press conference where he annunced he referred former PM Stansihev to the Prosecutor for breaking the law. Photo by BGNES

Notorious ex-President of the Bulgarian CSKA Football Club, Alexander Tomov, accuses the former Prime Minister, Sergey Stanishev, in stark violations of the law.

Tomov said Monday he had a videotape showing how the former PM issued a verbal order to the State Agency for National Security (DANS) to probe the football club, something Tomov says is illegal.

Tomov, who is also the leader of the “Bulgarian Social-Democratic” party, further informed he had notified the Prosecutor's Office about Stanishev's actions.

The probe, according to Tomov, concluded with a report which clearly proved there weren't any violations of the law in the club and there certainly wasn't anything that could present a threat to national security.

Tomov, who is also the former CEO of Bulgaria's troubled and now closed steel mill “Kremikovtzi” further said he had alerted the Minister of Economy and Energy and the Chair of the Parliamentary Economy Committee about other violations involving the mill and its bankruptcy. According to the former CEO, Stanishev and the circle around him attempted to use the same schemes to take over “Kremikovtzi” as they did with CSKA and that both the mill's and the club's financial troubles were staged and Kremikovtzi was forced into bankruptcy.

Tomov is currently indicted for document fraud and embezzlement of over EUR 5 M from CSKA and BGN 29 M from the „Kremikovtzi" steel mill.

If proven guilty, Tomov and the other three defendants face between 10 and 20 years behind bars.

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Tags: Alexander Tomov, CSKA Sofia FC, Kremikovtzi, trial, Sofia City Court

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